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Network Emulation

 

Test your app under all network conditions—3G/4G, satellite, WAN, cloud—in your lab.

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Protocol Testing

 

Are the network protocols implemented properly and securely, conforming to the specs, in your app or device?

 

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AUTOMATED NETWORK EMULATION TESTING

Test your app or device under all network conditions – from the routine to the extreme. Automate a wide variety of network conditions from 3G/4G to Cloud to WAN to Satellite to Internet. Uncover performance and operational issues prior to deployment.

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ARE YOU ALLOCATING YOUR TEST RESOURCES CORRECTLY?

Finding and fixing software defects constitutes the largest expense for the software industry. Learn why line speed testing isn’t enough and the importance of functional testing!

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UNDERSTANDING HOW APPLICATIONS PERFORM ON THE NETWORK—EVEN UNDER ADVERSE NETWORK CONDITIONS

Trial deployments are expensive and yield limited data. Learn how to properly characterize your application or device performance prior to deployment.

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"Apple uses Maxwell to emulate all varieties of customer networks and access points — from limited network bandwidth to extreme latency to packet drops.

By testing our products with Maxwell prior to deployment, we ensure that customers have a solid experience when they get new Apple software or hardware in their hands."

— Dmitry Halavin, Apple Inc.

If you are developing or maintaining a TCP stack, or if you are tasked with performance issues for network devices, you should get informed about "Bufferbloat". Wikipedia provides this summary of the Bufferbloat problem:

The problem is that the TCP congestion avoidance algorithm relies on packet drops to determine the bandwidth available. It speeds up the data transfer until packets start to drop, then slows down the connection. Ideally it speeds up and slows down until it finds an equilibrium equal to the speed of the link. However, for this to work the packet drops must occur in a timely manner, so that the algorithm can select a suitable transfer speed. With a large buffer, the packets will arrive, but with a higher latency. The packet is not dropped, so TCP does not slow down even though it really should. It does not slow down until it has sent so much beyond the capacity of the link that the buffer fills and drops packets, but this then means it has far overestimated the speed of the link.

In addition to the Wikipedia article, there is also a presentation from the Prague IETF meeting.

Finally, there is a wiki devoted to developing news.

InterWorking Labs is experimenting with Bufferbloat using Maxwell in our lab network, but so far we have been unable to reproduce it consistently.   For more information, please contact InterWorking Labs

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