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Does SilverCreek do performance testing?
What is the normal SNMP performance range suppose to be?


Q Does SilverCreek do performance testing?

A Yes. SilverCreek Performance Monitoring Tool allows the user to measure the response time to certain operations with a given device and then compare that to another device. This is useful for understanding performance issues and problems with a network application, the network itself, or the device itself. You can create scripts and run the scripts against several devices and then compare the output results to determine where performance bottlenecks exist and even what device performs best. 

A typical usage example would be: 
Send a NEXT on sysContact 500 times 
Send a GET on sysContact.0 500 times 
Send a SET on sysContact.0 500 times 

and then compare the resulted elapsed time in milliseconds, both for synchronous mode and asynchronous mode. 
The tool is very flexible, you can design your test cases, create a script and save it for future use.

You can create different scenarios to compare performance: 
for example, you can create "scripts" to compare

GET/SET/NEXT/BULK request on the same variable(s) 
GET on selected scalar(s) and columnar variable(s) 
SET on selected scalar(s) and columnar variable(s) 
NEXT on selected scalar(s) and columnar variable(s) 
BULK on selected scalar(s) and columnar variable(s) 
Synchronous requests (wait for the response after each request) vs. asynchronous requests (don't wait for the response after each request, rather it waits for the last response to come in).

SNMP supports both columnar and scalar objects. Columnar objects are located in a table and can have multiple instances, whereas scalar objects exist as single instance variables and are directly accessible. Thus, in a very large table, one may expect the access time to a columnar variable to be greater than that for a stand-alone scalar variable.

QWhat is the normal SNMP performance range suppose to be?

A There is no quick answer to this question. For the purpose of performance comparison you have to first establish a base first. 
The performance depends on lot of factors. For example:

* The size and amount of the SNMP data that is being retrieved.
* Is there lots of background traffic
* What kind of data are being retrieved
   Most implementation tends to do poorly when processing get-next
   request on a SNMP table that has lot of rows.
* The request type (get/get-next/bulk?)
   Usually Get operation performs better than get-next since the agent usually does not need to determine lexicographical ordering.
* SNMPv3 usually involves more overhead than v1/v2c
   Especially when there are authentication and encryption involved.
* Line speed...
* How many hops between the manager and agent.
   etc ...




 

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